I Grew Up Knowing I Wasn’t The Prettiest – Singer Lami Phillips

It looks like more Celebrities are coming out to share story about how they dealt with insecurities about their body image.

Singer, Lami Phillips took to her Instagram to share a picture of herself with family when she was younger and how she had always knew she wasn’t the prettiest.

She revealed that she internalised this so much it was hard to believe any boy who said they liked her.

Read her Caption Below:

“Yep…That’s me..The darkest person in the picture. I grew up knowing I wasn’t the prettiest.

My parents’ friends would joke ‘blacky’ or ask me in Yoruba “kilode to jo okunrin bayii?”

(why do you look like a boy). I was told I am short and thick. (Trust me it sounds worse in Yoruba.) I was also asked why I looked like my dad..why I wasn’t light skinned like my mom.

So many questions all directed at making me subconsciously question the way I look.

Over time I decided to ignore or compartmentalize these insecurities.. 

Thank God for my sense of humour because I dust off my shoulders joking about it.

I ignored that I was somehow unrecognizable in pictures or less favoured for certain opportunities. I was never called pretty as much as I can remember. I convinced myself that I was ordinary

So as a teenager when a boy said he liked me… i wouldn’t believe him.

Why would he like me when there are others prettier than me.

Little did I know I was far from ordinary. Little did they know that I was beautiful.

To understand the fruit we must examine the root.

Excuse me as i pursue PURPOSE (Most people won’t understand the “purpose” or meaning of this post/caption and that’s ok too) The singer ended.

View this post on Instagram

Yeah.. that’s me.. the darkest person in the picture. I grew up “knowing” that I wasn’t the prettiest. My parents friends would joke “blacky”.. or ask me in Yoruba “ki lo de to se jo okunrin bayi “ ( why do you look so much like a boy). I was told I was short and thick ( it sounds worse in Yoruba).. I was also asked why i looked like my dad. Why wasn’t I light skinned like my mother? So many questions… all somehow directed at making me subconsciously question the way I looked. Over time.. I decided to ignore or compartmentalize those insecurities. I ignored the fact that I was somewhat unrecognizable in photographs or less favored for certain opportunities. I was never called pretty as much as I can remember. I convinced myself that I was ordinary. Thank God for my sense of humour because I allowed it all dust off my shoulders by joking about it. So as a teenager when a boy said he liked me .. I wouldn’t believe it. Why would he like me when there are others prettier than me? Little did I know that I was far from ordinary. Little did they know.. that I was beautiful… TO UNDERSTAND THE FRUIT WE MUST EXAMINE THE ROOT. Excuse me as I pursue PURPOSE. (Most people won’t understand the “purpose” or meaning of this post/caption.. and that’s ok too) #skin #blackskin #blackgirl #colourism #bleachingISNEVERANOPTION #whydowelookdownonblack #blackskinmatters #beauty #stigma #blackish

A post shared by Lami Phillips-Gbadamosi (@lamiphillipsworld) on

Yesterday, TV Host, Bolanle shared her insecurity story too. How the stretch marks on her shoulders affected her confidence deeply as a child.

She wrote, “I first got my stretch marks on my shoulders when I had my first growth spurt. I was probably 12.

All my friends would wear tank tops and spaghetti tops and I felt like I had to cover my shoulders. It affected my confidence during my teenage years and I spent my early early adulthood hiding my shoulders

Well, I finally got over it and I realized it’s not a big deal. So to women and men who have stretch marks and feel self-conscious about it. ..please don’t.  You are beautiful no matter what.”  The media host advised.

https://www.instagram.com/bolanle/p/BwCv7gag-F-/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=2eihxu9kfdux

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